The American Psychological Association voted to prohibit its members from taking part in national-security interrogations. The action came after a report determined that psychologists assisted military interrogations in recent years. “Undisclosed coordination between some APA officials and Department of Defense psychologists … may have resulted in less restrictive ethical guidance for military psychologists in national security settings,” the organization said in a press release. “APA has apologized for the failures and … is working to correct faults in APA’s policies and procedures.” The new policy does not apply to cases involving domestic law enforcement or detention. APA psychologists also can take part in efforts to ensure the humane treatment of detainees. The APA is the nation’s largest organization of its kind, with more than 122,000 members.