DoD has released its results of this year’s Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey, including a breakdown of survey responses regarding telework practices. That is noteworthy because of the recent lack of information about telework in general; OPM has not put out what used to be an annual report on it since late 2013.

The DoD breakout shows, for example, that despite a 2010 law requiring all agencies to inform employees of whether they are eligible to telework, 37 percent of employees there say they have not received such a notice. Another 10 percent are not sure if they were notified, with 31 percent saying they were told they are eligible and 22 percent saying they were told they are not.

Typically employees are presumed eligible to telework, under the 2010 law, unless other issues override that presumption, such as the need to be on the job or data security concerns about working remotely.

Thirty percent said they do not telework because they have to be physically present at the job, and another 7 percent that they do not telework because they have technical issues that prevent it–a total more than the percentage told they are not eligible to telework.

Meanwhile, 25 percent said they do not telework because they have not received approval even though they have the type of job where they could telework. Another 15 percent said they are eligible but choose not to.

Overall, 12 percent telework only very infrequently or on an unscheduled or short-term basis, 4 percent no more than one or two days a month, 7 percent one or two days a week, and 2 percent three or more days a week.