Armed Forces News

Army housing in Presidio, CA. Additional rights for those who live in privatized housing include standard lease documents, the ability to withhold rent during a dispute, and access to a seven-year history of maintenance for the property in which they live.

Soldiers and their families stand to gain both better housing and more rights as tenants of privatized units. The service intends to provide related details sometime this month, which include $3 billion to be spent on improvements during the next five years. More than 1,100 National Guard and reserve centers and 156 installations will be affected.

“Privatized housing companies are spending $1.5 billion and reinvesting another $1.3 billion for housing improvements,” said J. E. Surash, the Army’s acting assistant secretary for installation, energy and environment.

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Besides housing and barracks, soldiers should see improved health care, child care, spouse employment and support for permanent change of station (PCS) moves. Additional rights for those who live in privatized housing include standard lease documents, the ability to withhold rent during a dispute, and access to a seven-year history of maintenance for the property in which they live.

The Army hopes to accommodate all families who need to make living arrangements when they transfer, even though on-base housing presently accommodates only about 30 percent of all who need it.

Poor and failing barracks all would be brought to standard by 2036. Three new child-care centers – two in Hawaii and wone at Fort Wainwright, Alaska – would be built. With sustained and adequate funding, the Army hopes to build 21 more child development centers and hire nearly 4,000 child-care providers during the next 10 years.